This website uses cookies and similar technologies to provide the best functionality and display content according to your interests on our site and social networks.

We respect your privacy and process information only for marketing and functional purposes if you give us your consent by clicking ‘I accept.’
You can change your cookie settings at any time by clicking on the privacy settings.

Privacy Notice
Settings
This website uses cookies and similar technologies to provide the best functionality and display content according to your interests on our site and social networks.

We respect your privacy and process information only for marketing and functional purposes if you give us your consent by clicking ‘I accept.’
You can change your cookie settings at any time by clicking on the privacy settings.

Privacy Notice
This cookie is used for system purposes only and does not track user actions. It is required for normal functioning of this web site.
This is a web analytics service.
Processing company
  • Google Ireland Limited
  • Google Building Gordon House, 4 Barrow St, Dublin, D04 E5W5, Ireland
Data Purposes
  • Marketing
  • Advertisement
  • Web Analytics
Technologies Used
  • Cookies
  • Pixel Tags
Data Attributes
  • IP address (anonymised)
  • Browser information (browser type, referring/exit pages, the files viewed on our site, operating system, date/time stamp, and/or clickstream data)
  • Usage Data (views, clicks)
Data Collected
This list represents all (personal) data that is collected by or through the use of this service.
  • IP address
  • Date and time of visit
  • Usage data
  • Click path
  • App updates
  • Browser information
  • Device information
  • JavaScript support
  • Pages visited
  • Referrer URL
  • Downloads
  • Flash version
  • Location information
  • Purchase activity
  • Widget interactions
Legal Basis
  • In the following the legal basis for the processing of personal data required by Art. 6 I 1 GDPR is listed.
  • Art. 6 (1) (a) GDPR
Location of Processing
  • Republic of Serbia
Retention Period
  • The data will be deleted as soon as they are no longer needed for the processing purposes.
Data Recipients
  • Alphabet Inc.
This is a Tracking technology offered by Facebook and used by other Facebook services such as Facebook Custom Audiences.
Processing company
  • Facebook Ireland Limited
  • 4 Grand Canal Square, Grand Canal Harbour, Dublin, D02, Ireland
Data Purposes
  • advertising
  • Marketing
  • Retargeting
  • Analyse
  • Tracking
Technologies Used
  • Cookies
Data Attributes
  • Pixel specific data
  • Http-Header
  • Optional Parameters
Data Collected
This list represents all (personal) data that is collected by or through the use of this service.
  • Facebook user ID
  • Browser information
  • Usage data
  • Geräteinformationen
  • Non-sensitive custom data
  • Referrer URL
  • Pixel ID
  • Location information
  • Pixel specific data
  • User behaviour
  • Ads viewed
  • Interactions with advertisement, services, and products
  • Marketing information
  • Content viewed
  • IP address
Legal Basis
  • In the following the legal basis for the processing of personal data required by Art. 6 I 1 GDPR is listed.
  • Art. 6 para. 1 s. 1 lit. a GDPR
Location of Processing
  • Republic of Serbia
Retention Period
  • The data will be deleted as soon as they are no longer needed for the processing purposes.
Data Recipients
  • Facebook Inc.
Blog / / We must work on mitigating vulnerability, breaking prejudice and fostering empathy
BLOG
We must work on mitigating vulnerability, breaking prejudice and fostering empathy
What is the first thing that comes to your mind when you hear the word depression, and what do you think of when you hear that someone is depressed? You are aware that nowadays we often hear the word itself, as well as some ‘depressing stories‘. Sometimes it seems present to such an extent that we constantly hear someone saying ‘oh, everyone is depressed/feel blue nowadays’. Not only does it wrongly generalize, but such an attitude also implies a serious problem because if everyone is depressed, it may turn out that it is not a serious issue or an important topic at all. It can, of course, go in a completely different direction – panic and helplessness. ‘If we are all in a ‘gutter’ then we cannot get out of it and save ourselves’. Whichever of these two paths we take, we reach a point where we do not help and support as much as we should - neither ourselves nor others. This is why it is important to define what depression is (and what is not) and to be aware of our relationship with people struggling with it.

When experts hear and use the word depression they refer to the condition in which at least five out of the following nine symptoms are present for minimum two weeks: 1) intense feeling of sadness or emptiness for a long period of time (two weeks and longer), that is present for most of the day; 2) low interest or absence of interest in activities that used to be pleasant; 3) sleep problems, such as insomnia or oversleeping; 4) problems with nutrition, such as taking too little or too much food; 5) feeling restless or irritable; 6) increased fatigue; 7) feelings of guilt and worthlessness that have no real cause or are exaggerated in relation to the event; 8) difficulties in maintaining concentration and making decisions and 9) suicidal thoughts, ideas or suicide attempts. Our patients and clients add their own ‘definitions’ to this description, such as, for example, that depression is ‘something sad - the saddest and empty – the most empty’, ‘the feeling as if you've been living your whole life under some kind of scrum, under some kind of anesthesia like that at the dentist where you feel nothing and nothing feels good’, ‘a feeling that you are constantly dragging 100 tons of weight and darkness with you through a tunnel where everything is black, both what is around you and what is in front of you’.

A person who has not experienced this can easily slip into minimizing the problem and the feeling that it is all a matter of choice, and consequently give advice such as ‘don't worry, do something useful, be positive, don't think about it, etc.’. Unfortunately, it is not uncommon to go a step further - to blame and criticize by saying something like ‘it's all about being lazy and spoilt - if they had to get up at five a.m. to do some physical work, I am sure they wouldn’t be depressed’ or ‘they are all weaklings who can't handle life and challenges’ or ‘they are all failures, because if they were successful in business and had money, they certainly wouldn't have any time or reason to be depressed.’ This understanding of people with depression, often accompanied by a stereotypical image of a ‘depressed person’ as someone who is unkempt, who constantly wears black, constantly cries and has gloomy thoughts, does not get out of bed and does nothing. Believing in these and similar images and stories makes us ‘shock’ again and again (although obviously not enough to change our attitude) every time we hear that comedians like Jim Carrey, the ones who lived life to the fullest, struggled with depression, like Anthony Bourdain and numerous other people who were ‘beautiful, well-dressed and smart’, rich and super successful.

These prejudices further hurt and reinforce the stigma, deepening feelings of inferiority, shame, loneliness, various other unpleasant emotions and all the symptoms mentioned at the beginning. The consequences are further distancing, finding it a problem to seek professional and any other help, as well as the tendency to mask depression (with bodily symptoms, functionality, humor, anger...) or ‘bury’ it with various things and substances. Social rules and prohibitions on certain emotions are indirectly told by the fact that in women the diagnosis of a depressive disorder occurs more often with anxiety or fear-related disorders, appetite disorders and weight gain, while men with depressive disorder more often have a disorder related to the use of alcohol or psychoactive substances, poor impulse control and increased risk-taking behavior. In men, depression is often masked and ‘turned’ into another problem because society and culture send the message that ‘(real/strong) men don't cry.’

Bearing all this in mind, it is a great and nothing less than heroic thing that a man living in this region, a public figure, describes with a book, clearly, loudly ‘out of his skin, life with depression’. We can't all do what Aleksandar Stanković did, but we can work to normalize vulnerability, break prejudices and cultivate empathy, compassion and solidarity. We can reach out and help get out of the gutter, out of stigma and darkness. It’s time!
AUTHOR
Tijana Mirović PhD
psychologist and psychotherapist